Lecture 13 (Climate Change: Move to Action (Winter 2008))

From CLASP Classes
Revision as of 12:58, 26 January 2010 by Rood (Talk | contribs)

Jump to: navigation, search

{{#if:Lecture 13 is where we seriously start to leave the science of climate change. There is an unstated notion in this lecture to get the class to start to think more seriously about projects! First the impacts of climate change are taken from the last two lectures. These changes are increasing temperature, sea level rise, changes in water resources and weather. With these changes there are many parts of society that are impacted, agriculture and public health, for example. These impacts motivate responses in fields such as law and policy. This stands in contrast with the analysis presented in the beginning of the course. In the beginning there was the start with the generation of knowledge about climate change, its communication, and people's response based on a range of interests. This impacts-based and knowledge-based approach is a fundamental divide between how people evaluate and prioritize the importance of problems. There is, in this an element of a classic tension between long-term and short-term factors in problem solving. This motivates a more in depth discussion of mitigation and adaptation and, again, the conflict between the long-term and the short-term move to the forefront. These ideas lead to the more consideration of vulnerability, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity. This is an interface to people, population, and societies. One way to structure and formalize these ideas is presented, and it becomes clear how adaptation to climate change varies widely from country to country, city to city, region to region, rich to poor. Ethics and, de facto, law are injected into the problem of climate change.|== Lecture Summary == Lecture 13 is where we seriously start to leave the science of climate change. There is an unstated notion in this lecture to get the class to start to think more seriously about projects! First the impacts of climate change are taken from the last two lectures. These changes are increasing temperature, sea level rise, changes in water resources and weather. With these changes there are many parts of society that are impacted, agriculture and public health, for example. These impacts motivate responses in fields such as law and policy. This stands in contrast with the analysis presented in the beginning of the course. In the beginning there was the start with the generation of knowledge about climate change, its communication, and people's response based on a range of interests. This impacts-based and knowledge-based approach is a fundamental divide between how people evaluate and prioritize the importance of problems. There is, in this an element of a classic tension between long-term and short-term factors in problem solving. This motivates a more in depth discussion of mitigation and adaptation and, again, the conflict between the long-term and the short-term move to the forefront. These ideas lead to the more consideration of vulnerability, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity. This is an interface to people, population, and societies. One way to structure and formalize these ideas is presented, and it becomes clear how adaptation to climate change varies widely from country to country, city to city, region to region, rich to poor. Ethics and, de facto, law are injected into the problem of climate change.|}} {{#if:Powerpoint Lecture 13|===Lecture Link=== Powerpoint Lecture 13|}} {{#if:* Climate change and society

    • Impacts based approach
    • Knowledge based approach
      • Value systems and rationality
  • Relation of climate change to, say, energy and agriculture
    • Conflicting interests
  • Mitigation and Adaptation
    • Formalizing the approach to adaptation
  • Social justice|===Lecture Outline===
  • Climate change and society
    • Impacts based approach
    • Knowledge based approach
      • Value systems and rationality
  • Relation of climate change to, say, energy and agriculture
    • Conflicting interests
  • Mitigation and Adaptation
    • Formalizing the approach to adaptation
  • Social justice|}}

{{#if:Brooks: Framework for Understanding Vulnerability and Ability to Adapt|== Assigned Reading == Brooks: Framework for Understanding Vulnerability and Ability to Adapt|}} {{#if:Eakin: Building Adaptive Capacity in Latin America |== Relevant Reading == Eakin: Building Adaptive Capacity in Latin America |}} {{#if:|== Foundational References == {{{Foundational References}}}|}} {{#if:|== Relevant Readings Posted by Others == {{{Relevant Readings Posted by Others}}}|}} {{#if:Impacts, Population, Response, Social Justice|== Topics Covered == Impacts, Population, Response, Social Justice|}} {{#arraymap:Impacts, Population, Response, Social Justice|,|q|| }} {{#arraymap:W08|,|q|| }} {{#arraymap:Assigned, Relevant|,|q|| }}



Return to Climate Change: The Move to Action or Database