Lecture 15 (Climate Change: Move to Action (Winter 2008))

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{{#if:Lecture 15 is about energy: Current and Past Energy Use. Jasper Kok is the primary author. The beginning of the lecture introduces the primary sources of carbon dioxide emission, fossil fuel burning, deforestation, and cement making. These sources are then detailed. With regard to fossil fuels, the roles of coal, oil, and natural gas are highlighted as a function of time. Of special note is how coal use changed in the 1950s as both Europe and the United States were suffering major public health problems. Residential use of coal in cities was virtually eliminated; clean air acts were initiated. (Two things to think about: Compare China today with U.S. and Europe 60 years ago. What is the impact of "clean air" on climate change?) The use of fossil fuels is directly related to population, but more important, for the past emissions, is the relationship to gross domestic product; there is a strong correlation to consumption. Alternative sources of energy are introduced, but deferred until a future lecture. The use of energy by economic sector and end use is highlighted. These different cuts through the energy use reveal both leverage points in addressing energy consumption as well as showing the complexity of reducing energy use. Finally, external costs of energy are introduced, international stability, national security, and public health are at the top of the list.|== Lecture Summary == Lecture 15 is about energy: Current and Past Energy Use. Jasper Kok is the primary author. The beginning of the lecture introduces the primary sources of carbon dioxide emission, fossil fuel burning, deforestation, and cement making. These sources are then detailed. With regard to fossil fuels, the roles of coal, oil, and natural gas are highlighted as a function of time. Of special note is how coal use changed in the 1950s as both Europe and the United States were suffering major public health problems. Residential use of coal in cities was virtually eliminated; clean air acts were initiated. (Two things to think about: Compare China today with U.S. and Europe 60 years ago. What is the impact of "clean air" on climate change?) The use of fossil fuels is directly related to population, but more important, for the past emissions, is the relationship to gross domestic product; there is a strong correlation to consumption. Alternative sources of energy are introduced, but deferred until a future lecture. The use of energy by economic sector and end use is highlighted. These different cuts through the energy use reveal both leverage points in addressing energy consumption as well as showing the complexity of reducing energy use. Finally, external costs of energy are introduced, international stability, national security, and public health are at the top of the list.|}} {{#if:Powerpoint Lecture 15|===Lecture Link=== Powerpoint Lecture 15|}} {{#if:* Lecture 1: Current and past energy use

    • CO2 emissions: where do they come from?
    • Current sources of energy
    • Emissions from economic sectors
    • Energy consumption by end use
    • External costs to energy use (besides climate change)|===Lecture Outline===
  • Lecture 1: Current and past energy use
    • CO2 emissions: where do they come from?
    • Current sources of energy
    • Emissions from economic sectors
    • Energy consumption by end use
    • External costs to energy use (besides climate change)|}}

{{#if:Pacala and Socolow: Wedges for mitigation of climate change (Science, 2004)|== Assigned Reading == Pacala and Socolow: Wedges for mitigation of climate change (Science, 2004)|}} {{#if:Pacala and Socolow: Wedges for mitigation of climate change: Supporting material (Science, 2004)

Socolow and Pacala: Keeping Carbon in Check (Scientific American, 2006)|== Relevant Reading == Pacala and Socolow: Wedges for mitigation of climate change: Supporting material (Science, 2004)

Socolow and Pacala: Keeping Carbon in Check (Scientific American, 2006)|}} {{#if:Energy Information Administration (EIA) keeps track of (inter)national energy use and future trends.|== Foundational References == Energy Information Administration (EIA) keeps track of (inter)national energy use and future trends.|}} {{#if:|== Relevant Readings Posted by Others == {{{Relevant Readings Posted by Others}}}|}} {{#if:Energy, Guest Speakers|== Topics Covered == Energy, Guest Speakers|}} {{#arraymap:Energy, Guest Speakers|,|q|| }} {{#arraymap:W08|,|q|| }} {{#arraymap:Relevant, Foundational References|,|q|| }}



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