Lecture 16 (Climate Change: Move to Action (Winter 2008))

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{{#if:Lecture 16 starts with a summary of current energy production, and explicitly shows that coal-electricity, oil-transportation are the points where it is easiest to get a handle on carbon dioxide emissions. A number of granularities come forward, regional-global, centralized-distributed emissions - one solution does not fit all situations, and there are specific places where we get the largest impact with our actions. Energy security is more urgent and more demanding of attention than climate change mitigation. Many strategies to achieve energy security are neutral to negative to climate change. If we are going to address climate change, then we need, ultimately, a policy that addresses the buildup of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Policy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions is a natural response of society to address the buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.

The science-policy interface is introduced. The formal way that scientists inform governments on climate change policy is through assessments by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. This is supplemented in the U.S. by the Climate Change Study Program and reviews by the National Academy of Sciences. While these formal processes do evaluate scientific information and inform governments, that information is ultimately used in concert with many other competing pieces of information and motivators.

Repeatedly, we are brought to long-term / short-term tensions and local / global tensions. An overview of policy responses is introduced, starting with global policy focussed on mitigation of climate change. The concept of "dangerous" climate change is introduced, and attempts to quantify dangerous climate change are discussed. To date, our efforts have not effectively curtailed the release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. The Kyoto Protocol is discussed, and the fact that market mechanisms are built into the protocol is stated as important. Regional, state, and local policies are developing, based on many factors, most often on some aspect of local economic incentives.|== Lecture Summary == Lecture 16 starts with a summary of current energy production, and explicitly shows that coal-electricity, oil-transportation are the points where it is easiest to get a handle on carbon dioxide emissions. A number of granularities come forward, regional-global, centralized-distributed emissions - one solution does not fit all situations, and there are specific places where we get the largest impact with our actions. Energy security is more urgent and more demanding of attention than climate change mitigation. Many strategies to achieve energy security are neutral to negative to climate change. If we are going to address climate change, then we need, ultimately, a policy that addresses the buildup of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Policy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions is a natural response of society to address the buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.

The science-policy interface is introduced. The formal way that scientists inform governments on climate change policy is through assessments by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. This is supplemented in the U.S. by the Climate Change Study Program and reviews by the National Academy of Sciences. While these formal processes do evaluate scientific information and inform governments, that information is ultimately used in concert with many other competing pieces of information and motivators.

Repeatedly, we are brought to long-term / short-term tensions and local / global tensions. An overview of policy responses is introduced, starting with global policy focussed on mitigation of climate change. The concept of "dangerous" climate change is introduced, and attempts to quantify dangerous climate change are discussed. To date, our efforts have not effectively curtailed the release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. The Kyoto Protocol is discussed, and the fact that market mechanisms are built into the protocol is stated as important. Regional, state, and local policies are developing, based on many factors, most often on some aspect of local economic incentives.|}} {{#if:Powerpoint Lecture 16|===Lecture Link=== Powerpoint Lecture 16|}} {{#if:* Summary of Energy-Climate Relation

  • Need for “carbon policy”
  • IPCC: Formal science-policy interface
  • Global policy of mitigation
  • UN Framework Convention for Climate Change
  • “Dangerous” climate change
  • Kyoto protocol
  • Market mechanisms
  • Regional, State and Local Policy|===Lecture Outline===
  • Summary of Energy-Climate Relation
  • Need for “carbon policy”
  • IPCC: Formal science-policy interface
  • Global policy of mitigation
  • UN Framework Convention for Climate Change
  • “Dangerous” climate change
  • Kyoto protocol
  • Market mechanisms
  • Regional, State and Local Policy|}}

{{#if:Jasanoff: The Fifth Branch (Chapter 1)

Pew: State-based Initiatives (2006)

Pew: State-based Initiatives (Update, 2007)|== Assigned Reading == Jasanoff: The Fifth Branch (Chapter 1)

Pew: State-based Initiatives (2006)

Pew: State-based Initiatives (Update, 2007)|}} {{#if:Rabe: Congressional Testimony (2007)

Pew: Beyond Kyoto|== Relevant Reading == Rabe: Congressional Testimony (2007)

Pew: Beyond Kyoto|}} {{#if:UNFCCC: Text of Convention

Kyoto Protocol: Text

Kyoto Protocol: Introduction and Summary|== Foundational References == UNFCCC: Text of Convention

Kyoto Protocol: Text

Kyoto Protocol: Introduction and Summary|}} {{#if:|== Relevant Readings Posted by Others == {{{Relevant Readings Posted by Others}}}|}} {{#if:Climate Organizations, Energy, IPCC, Policy|== Topics Covered == Climate Organizations, Energy, IPCC, Policy|}} {{#arraymap:Climate Organizations, Energy, IPCC, Policy|,|q|| }} {{#arraymap:W08|,|q|| }} {{#arraymap:Relevant, Foundational References|,|q|| }}



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