Difference between revisions of "Lecture 24 (Climate Change: Move to Action (Winter 2008))"

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|Topics Covered=Attribution, Impacts, Projects, Public Health
 
|Topics Covered=Attribution, Impacts, Projects, Public Health
 
|Semester=W08
 
|Semester=W08
|Readings=Assigned, Relevant, Foundational References
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|Readings=Core Readings, Relevant, Foundational References
 
|Format=Lecture
 
|Format=Lecture
 
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Revision as of 17:25, 16 February 2010

{{#if:Lecture 24 is on climate change and public health, but it really uses public health as a problem type to reveal the attributes of climate change problem solving. (First, however, in the lecture is a review of the important concepts of attribution and fingerprinting.)

Climate change is expected to impact public health through several mechanisms. These include increasing exposure to heat, more extreme weather, changes in the ranges of diseases, and, possibly, an increase of refugees. There are also some potential benefits, less exposure to cold. There are some characteristics of the public health challenges worth noting. First, all of these problems currently exist. Climate change might amplify them, but they also reflect problems of population, resource distribution and wealth. Second, there are strategies to address the problems and assets often in place to address them. Therefore, the most effective response is often in the use (and better use) of these assets. Third, the response to these problems is often in the spirit of improving the use of existing assets or with solutions that might be in the spirit of "engineering" or "technology." For example, use of mosquito nets or more insecticides. (This also means that this class of problems is not likely to be the policy catalyst (See Lecture 19))

Finally, a research project into heat waves is discussed which shows how environmental information is linked to geographical information and population information. This shows the mixture of information that is required for effective problem solving.|== Lecture Summary == Lecture 24 is on climate change and public health, but it really uses public health as a problem type to reveal the attributes of climate change problem solving. (First, however, in the lecture is a review of the important concepts of attribution and fingerprinting.)

Climate change is expected to impact public health through several mechanisms. These include increasing exposure to heat, more extreme weather, changes in the ranges of diseases, and, possibly, an increase of refugees. There are also some potential benefits, less exposure to cold. There are some characteristics of the public health challenges worth noting. First, all of these problems currently exist. Climate change might amplify them, but they also reflect problems of population, resource distribution and wealth. Second, there are strategies to address the problems and assets often in place to address them. Therefore, the most effective response is often in the use (and better use) of these assets. Third, the response to these problems is often in the spirit of improving the use of existing assets or with solutions that might be in the spirit of "engineering" or "technology." For example, use of mosquito nets or more insecticides. (This also means that this class of problems is not likely to be the policy catalyst (See Lecture 19))

Finally, a research project into heat waves is discussed which shows how environmental information is linked to geographical information and population information. This shows the mixture of information that is required for effective problem solving.|}} {{#if:Powerpoint Lecture 24|===Lecture Link=== Powerpoint Lecture 24|}} {{#if:* Projects Redux

  • Revisit fingerprinting and attribution
    • Questions
  • Public health and climate change: A paradigm problem
    • Heatwaves|===Lecture Outline===
  • Projects Redux
  • Revisit fingerprinting and attribution
    • Questions
  • Public health and climate change: A paradigm problem
    • Heatwaves|}}

{{#if:WHO: Climate Change and Public Health

[http://climateknowledge.org/figures/Rood_Climate_Change_AOSS480_Documents/McMichael_Climate_Health_BritMedJourn_2008.pdf McMichael: Analysis of Health Impact, Inequality, and Health Sector Of Interest]|== Assigned Reading == WHO: Climate Change and Public Health

[http://climateknowledge.org/figures/Rood_Climate_Change_AOSS480_Documents/McMichael_Climate_Health_BritMedJourn_2008.pdf McMichael: Analysis of Health Impact, Inequality, and Health Sector Of Interest]|}} {{#if:Meehl and Tebaldi: Climate Change and Heat Waves

[http://climateknowledge.org/figures/Rood_Climate_Change_AOSS480_Documents/Watson_Patz_Warming_Health_2005.pdf Watson: Overview of Science, Policy, Public Health, etc. Foundational Reading]|== Relevant Reading == Meehl and Tebaldi: Climate Change and Heat Waves

[http://climateknowledge.org/figures/Rood_Climate_Change_AOSS480_Documents/Watson_Patz_Warming_Health_2005.pdf Watson: Overview of Science, Policy, Public Health, etc. Foundational Reading]|}} {{#if:A new foundational reading is added. This is an initiative on climate change from the business consulting firm McKinsey McKinsey: Climate Change Special Initiative|== Foundational References == A new foundational reading is added. This is an initiative on climate change from the business consulting firm McKinsey McKinsey: Climate Change Special Initiative|}} {{#if:|== Relevant Readings Posted by Others == {{{Relevant Readings Posted by Others}}}|}} {{#if:Attribution, Impacts, Projects, Public Health|== Topics Covered == Attribution, Impacts, Projects, Public Health|}} {{#arraymap:Attribution, Impacts, Projects, Public Health|,|q|| }} {{#arraymap:W08|,|q|| }} {{#arraymap:Core Readings, Relevant, Foundational References|,|q|| }}



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