Lecture 25 (Climate Change: Move to Action (Winter 2008))

From CLASP Classes
Revision as of 11:51, 28 October 2009 by Rood (Talk | contribs) (Created page with '{{Lecture |Lecture Summary=Lecture 25, ultimately, focuses on the business community and the role the business community has in addressing the challenges of climate change. The …')

(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
Jump to: navigation, search

{{#if:Lecture 25, ultimately, focuses on the business community and the role the business community has in addressing the challenges of climate change. The lecture arrives at the front door of the business community after doing a synthesis of the material presented in the course.

The scientific background that motivates concern about human-induced climate change is introduced, and this knowledge motivates us "to do something." Doing something often first focuses on the government and the development of policy to fix the problem. In the case of climate change doing something pervades society, and it is naive to imagine that there is a simple policy solution. The challenges of climate change sit in relationship with population and consumption and energy and, hence, wealth. Acquisition and preservation of wealth is of central, urgent, importance to societies, to people - often, even if you think you disdain wealth. Considering the interface between all of the communities vested in climate change introduces granularity. Recognizing and using that granularity is important to developing paths to solution. That granularity can be viewed as near term and long term, local and regional and nations and global, poor and rich. For problem solving, an important set of time scales are those associated with accumulation of a lifetime of wealth and those associated with expenditures in infrastructure such as refineries and power plants and bridges. Fifty years is long, and anything longer than fifty years is very long. Climate change is viewed, by most, as a problem of the VERY long term.

The lecture revisits the climate-policy interface and the idea that uncertainty, a product of science, can always be used to keep policy from converging - especially in face of a problem that is VERY long term and that impacts, potentially, wealth. Policy is, however, an important component of the paths to solution. For policy to develop, there needs to be a reason, a motivator, a catalyst. An intuitive motivator for policy is the economic impact of climate change. But economics is a big beast, with long term and short term aspects, and any information on the long term is derived from models, and associated with those models in uncertainty. Therefore, economics is like science, a mixture of knowledge and uncertainty. The models of economics do not have the benefit of a physical foundation; the uncertainties are far larger. Economic considerations do not, in the near term, provide a strong catalyst for the convergence of policy.

The lecture considers the roles of impacts such as heat waves and water resources as motivators for policy. The role of law. These considerations do not, obviously, lead to the convergence of policy. They often lead to the fragmentation of policy, and the fragmentation of policy is, often, an accelerator of policy.

With the link of addressing the challenges of climate change to energy and to economic success, connectivity between all of these communities comes from monetary valuation. Hence there is a propensity, in this wealth-centric view of the world, to head towards market-based approaches to the problem. Hence the business community is an essential community in developing paths to solution

(Much thanks to Andrew Hoffman for introducing me to the business aspects of climate change.)|== Lecture Summary == Lecture 25, ultimately, focuses on the business community and the role the business community has in addressing the challenges of climate change. The lecture arrives at the front door of the business community after doing a synthesis of the material presented in the course.

The scientific background that motivates concern about human-induced climate change is introduced, and this knowledge motivates us "to do something." Doing something often first focuses on the government and the development of policy to fix the problem. In the case of climate change doing something pervades society, and it is naive to imagine that there is a simple policy solution. The challenges of climate change sit in relationship with population and consumption and energy and, hence, wealth. Acquisition and preservation of wealth is of central, urgent, importance to societies, to people - often, even if you think you disdain wealth. Considering the interface between all of the communities vested in climate change introduces granularity. Recognizing and using that granularity is important to developing paths to solution. That granularity can be viewed as near term and long term, local and regional and nations and global, poor and rich. For problem solving, an important set of time scales are those associated with accumulation of a lifetime of wealth and those associated with expenditures in infrastructure such as refineries and power plants and bridges. Fifty years is long, and anything longer than fifty years is very long. Climate change is viewed, by most, as a problem of the VERY long term.

The lecture revisits the climate-policy interface and the idea that uncertainty, a product of science, can always be used to keep policy from converging - especially in face of a problem that is VERY long term and that impacts, potentially, wealth. Policy is, however, an important component of the paths to solution. For policy to develop, there needs to be a reason, a motivator, a catalyst. An intuitive motivator for policy is the economic impact of climate change. But economics is a big beast, with long term and short term aspects, and any information on the long term is derived from models, and associated with those models in uncertainty. Therefore, economics is like science, a mixture of knowledge and uncertainty. The models of economics do not have the benefit of a physical foundation; the uncertainties are far larger. Economic considerations do not, in the near term, provide a strong catalyst for the convergence of policy.

The lecture considers the roles of impacts such as heat waves and water resources as motivators for policy. The role of law. These considerations do not, obviously, lead to the convergence of policy. They often lead to the fragmentation of policy, and the fragmentation of policy is, often, an accelerator of policy.

With the link of addressing the challenges of climate change to energy and to economic success, connectivity between all of these communities comes from monetary valuation. Hence there is a propensity, in this wealth-centric view of the world, to head towards market-based approaches to the problem. Hence the business community is an essential community in developing paths to solution

(Much thanks to Andrew Hoffman for introducing me to the business aspects of climate change.)|}} {{#if:|===Lecture Link=== {{{Lecture Link}}}|}} {{#if:* Synthesis

  • Business|===Lecture Outline===
  • Synthesis
  • Business|}}

{{#if:Hoffman: Pew Corporate Strategies 2006

McKinsey: Global Business Survey 2008|== Assigned Reading == Hoffman: Pew Corporate Strategies 2006

McKinsey: Global Business Survey 2008|}} {{#if:U.S. Climate Action Partnership

  • CAP Call for Action

CERES: Coalition of Investors, Environmental and Public Interest Groups

  • Click Publications: Look at 2003 and 2006 Corporate Governance|== Relevant Reading ==

U.S. Climate Action Partnership

  • CAP Call for Action

CERES: Coalition of Investors, Environmental and Public Interest Groups

  • Click Publications: Look at 2003 and 2006 Corporate Governance|}}

{{#if:|== Foundational References == {{{Foundational References}}}|}} {{#if:|== Relevant Readings Posted by Others == {{{Relevant Readings Posted by Others}}}|}} {{#if:Business|== Topics Covered == Business|}} {{#arraymap:Business|,|q|| }} {{#arraymap:W08|,|q|| }} {{#arraymap:Assigned, Relevant|,|q|| }}



Return to Climate Change: The Move to Action or Database